Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Consider your passions in the field of early childhood education, and think about an area of the field where you would like to direct your advocacy efforts. To support you in determi | Wridemy

Consider your passions in the field of early childhood education, and think about an area of the field where you would like to direct your advocacy efforts. To support you in determi

Consider your passions in the field of early childhood education, and think about an area of the field where you would like to direct your advocacy efforts. To support you in determi

To prepare:

  • Consider your passions in the field of early childhood education, and think about an area of the field where you would like to direct your advocacy efforts. To support you in determining an area of advocacy you would like to pursue, review the websites of the professional organizations listed in the Learning Resources.

8085 Module 1 Assignment:

Early Childhood Education Topics and Professional Organizations: Focus on Leadership

Effective leaders must remain current within the early childhood field. Leaders need to understand changes and opportunities within early childhood education, as well as the influences of and fluctuations within the broader societal context. There are numerous resources available within the field to support leaders in remaining current; however, leaders must have skills in critical analysis, compilation, and networking in order to use these resources most effectively.

Some of the more accessible resources available to leaders within early childhood education are professional, credible websites. Websites can provide current news, research, job opportunities, evidence-based applications, networking opportunities and resources, and information on critical advocacy issues. As a leader, developing knowledge of websites as an essential resource is critical. Skills in processing and sharing information with others are also important aspects of leadership capacity.

This Assignment requires that you begin to explore and develop advocacy topics you are interested in, with the goal of developing an initial advocacy action plan. In Module 4, you will be responsible for developing an advocacy action plan for your Learning Outcomes Plan. As this point in your course, you will explore advocacy topics in which you are developing an interest and begin to develop competencies needed to become an effective advocate.

To complete your Assignment, consider an advocacy topic you are interested in learning more about, carefully reflecting on your interests and passions, and where you would like to devote time and effort to make a difference in the lives of young children, their families, and the field. Consider something you would like to study, a topic about which you would like to connect with others, and where you would like to invest time and effort in order to make a difference.

After selecting your topic, you will use professional websites as a tool to increase knowledge of that topic. Also, you will compile websites and resources, which will allow you the opportunity to build, or add to, your own professional “tool kit” of resources and connections.

This Assignment is designed to support your skills in advocating regarding an issue you are passionate about, as well as your leadership skills in the areas of compiling resources, identifying issues, determining stakeholders, and identifying leadership opportunities.

Professional Organizations and Advocacy

To prepare:

· Consider your passions in the field of early childhood education, (my passion is to become an Early Childhood College Professor) and think about an area of the field where you would like to direct your advocacy efforts. To support you in determining an area of advocacy you would like to pursue, review the websites of the professional organizations listed in the Learning Resources.

· As you review the websites, consider what you would like to know more about, how you would like to support others, and which topics presented seem to fit best with your current passions and professional interests. You may select topics and websites other than those presented. The professional organization websites in the Learning Resources are designed to serve as a guide.

· Select three organizational websites and three resources from one or more of the websites you chose that complement your selected advocacy topic. These resources may include such items as positions statements, articles, videos, etc., providing research, information, and insights that relate to your topic. Your goal in selecting these resources is to provide an overview of your topic, familiarize yourself with advocacy work that has been conducted on the topic, and analyze how the information presented can assist you in working toward your advocacy goals.

To complete this Assignment:

· Provide a brief overview of the advocacy topic you selected and a rationale for your selection. As you develop your overview, consider the following:

· Why is the topic you selected important for young children, families, professionals, and/or the field of early childhood education?

· What draws you to the advocacy topic you have selected?

· Based on the organizational websites you selected (3 total), provide a summary that includes the following:

· A general overview of how the work of the organization complements your advocacy goal

· Opportunities for engagement/collaboration with the organization around your selected advocacy topic

· How becoming involved with the organization might assist you in achieving your advocacy goals

· For each of the resources you selected from one or more of the organizational websites (3 total), provide a summary that includes the following:

· A general overview of information from the resource that relates to your advocacy topic

· Three to five main points that you feel would support your advocacy goals

· A citation

Be sure to cite appropriate references in APA format to substantiate your thinking.

Learning Resources

Required Resources

Amanchukwu, R. N., Stanley, G. J., & Ololube, N. P. (2015). A review of leadership theories, principles and styles and their relevance to educational management. Management, 5(1), 6–14. doi:10.5923/j.mm.20150501.02

Beyer, B. (2012). Blending constructs and concepts: Development of emerging theories of organizational leadership and their relationship to leadership practices for social justice. Retrieved from http://cnx.org/contents/[email protected]/Blending-Constructs-and-Concepts

Bloom, P. J. & Abel, M. B. (2015). Expanding the lens—leadership as an organizational asset. Young Children, 70(2), 10–17. 

Hallet, E. (2013). We all share a common vision and passion: Early years professionals reflect upon their leadership of practice role. Journal of Early Childhood Research, 11(3), 312–325. doi:10.1177/1476718X1349088

Hard, L., & Jónsdóttir, A. H. (2013). Leadership is not a dirty word: Exploring and embracing leadership in ECEC. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 21(3), 311–325. doi:10.1080/1350293X.2013.814355

Leeson, C. (2014). The pressures of leading early years services in a changing world. In J. Moyles, J. Payler, & J. Georgeson (Eds.), Early years foundations: Critical issues (2nd ed., pp. 143–154). Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264688756_  

Lewis, J., & Hill, J. (2012). What does leadership look like in early childhood settings? Retrieved from http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/our-publications/every-child-magazine/every-child-index/every-child-vol-18-4-2012/leadership-look-like-early-childhood-settings/

McCormick Center for Early Childhood Leadership. (2015, Summer). An international perspective on early childhood leadership. Research Notes. Retrieved from http://mccormickcenter.nl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/RN-Summer-2015.pdf

Muñoz, M., Boulton , P., Johnson, T., & Unal, C. (2015). Leadership development for a changing early childhood landscape. YC Young Children, 70(2), 26–31.

National Policy Board for Educational Administrati

Orr, T., & Cleveland-Innes, M. (2015). Appreciative leadership: Supporting education innovation. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(4), 235–240.  

on. (2015). Professional standards for educational leaders. Retrieved from http://www.ccsshttps://www.proquest.com/docview/1789785813?accountid=14872&forcedol=trueo.org/Documents/2015/ProfessionalStandardsforEdu

https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eue&AN=87017544&site=ehost-live&scope=site&authtype=shib&custid=s6527200

Professional Organization Websites

Save the Children Action Network. (n.d.). Retrieved December 6, 2016, from https://www.savethechildrenactionnetwork.org/

American Educational Research Association. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.aera.net/

National Association for the Education of Young Children. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/

Zero to Three. (2016a). Retrieved from http://www.zerotothree.org/

National Association of Elementary School Principals. (2016). Retrieved from  http://www.naesp.org/

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/

National Institute for Early Education Research. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.nieer.org/

Harvard Family Research Project. (2016). Early childhood education. Retrieved from http://www.hfrp.org/early-childhood-education

Required Media

California Department of Education (Producer). (2013). Invitation to leadership in early childhood [Video file]. Retrieved from http://ececompsat.org/competencies/lead/lead.html

Note: This video is part of a series of California ECE competencies

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Varhaiskasvatuksen  Tiedelehti   Journal  of  Early  Childhood  Education  Research     Vol.3,  No.1,  2014,  65−81  

  ©  2014  Suomen  Varhaiskasvatus  ry.  –  Early  Childhood  Education  Association  Finland.     Peer-­‐review   under  responsibility  of  the  editorial  board  of  the  journal     ISSN  2323-­‐7414;     ISSN-­‐L  2323-­‐7414     online  

65  

  Being  and  Becoming  Early  Childhood  

Leaders:  Reflections  on  Leadership  Studies   in  Early  Childhood  Education  and  the   Future  Leadership  Research  Agenda  

   

Manjula  Waniganayake    

Institute  of  Early  Childhood,  Macquarie  University,  Sydney,  Australia   e-­‐mail:  [email protected]  

     

ABSTRACT:   In  Australia,  educational  leadership  studies  emerged  as  a  core  area  of   study   within   early   childhood   bachelor   degree   courses   during   the   1990s.   This   inclusion  was  supported  by  findings  from  newly  emerging  research  on  leadership   involving  early  childhood  educators.  A  handful  of  Australian  and  Finnish  scholars   joined  researchers  based  in  the  USA  to  actively  research  leadership  focusing  on  the   early  childhood  sector.  In  this  paper,  reflections  on  what  has  been  achieved  over  the   past  two  decades  in  promoting  leadership  studies  in  the  early  childhood  sector  is   analysed  as  a  starting  point  to  evaluate  learning  and  stimulate  further  discussion  on   additional  work  necessary  in  preparing  future  leaders.  This  analysis  will  be  based  on   exploring  key  assumptions  about  distributed  leadership  models  being  favoured  by   policy   planners   and   practitioners.   In   identifying   gaps   in   our   knowledge   base,   possibilities   for   further   research   are   presented   by   drawing   on   developments   in   Australia  and  elsewhere  as  appropriate.  

 

  Keywords:  early  childhood  leadership,  leadership  research,  leadership  preparation.    

 

 

Theorising  leadership  in  early  childhood  

Leadership  is  a  word  used  all  around  the  world.  Its  abstract  nature  has  however  meant   that  there  is  no  single  universal  definition  or  agreement  on  what  leadership  is  and  how   it  can  be  assessed  and  understood.  Researching  leadership  is  also  challenging  because  it   is  difficult   to   identify,  quantify  or  observe,  and  as  Rodd  (2013)  declares,   sometimes,  

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Waniganayake     —     Varhaiskasvatuksen  Tiedelehti     —     JECER     3(1)  2014,  65–81.   http://jecer.org/fi      

“effective   leadership   is  enacted  by  standing  back,   saying  or  doing  nothing.”   (p.  233).   Nevertheless,  leadership  is  often  identified  as  a  key  element  in  delivering  high  quality   early   childhood   programs   (Hujala,   Waniganayake   &   Rodd,   2013).     In   effect,   conceptualisations  of   leadership  are  best  understood  when  nuanced  within   the   local   contexts  of  enactment.  

Writing  about   leadership  within  early  childhood  settings   in  Australia,  Waniganayake,   Cheeseman,   Fennech,   Hadley   and   Shepherd   (2012,   p.11)   have   suggested   that   when   exploring  leadership  one  must  take  into  account  the  person  (the  leader),  the  position   (authority  to  make  decisions)  and  the  place  (the  organisational  setting).  Which  of  these   three  elements  are  emphasised  or  prioritised  within  the  daily  practice  of  early  childhood   leadership  is  however,  highly  variable  and  context  specific.  This  view  is  encapsulated  in   the  definition  of  early  childhood  leadership  presented  by  Nivala  (1999  cited  in  Hujala,   2013,  p.  53)  as  “a  socially  constructed,  situational  and  interpretive  phenomenon.”  These   Finnish   early   childhood   scholars   are   pioneer   researchers   who   recognised   the   importance   of   context   in   researching   leadership.   Their   contextual   leadership   model   integrates   the   structural   components   of   early   childhood   organisations   by   drawing   attention   to   the   vision,   mission,   core   tasks   and   responsibilities   of   early   childhood   leaders.  

This  article  aims  to  present  critical  reflections  about  the  importance  of  preparing  early   childhood   educators   for   leadership   enactment.     Given   the   increasing   complexity   of   challenges  encountered  by  today’s  early  childhood  educators  in  the  frontline  of  service   delivery,   it   is   imperative  that  those   in   leadership  roles  are  well  prepared  in  order  to   respond  effectively  to  support  the  education  and  wellbeing  of  children  and  families  in   their  communities.     Adopting  a  contextual  approach,  pathways  to  being  and  becoming   leaders   in   Early   Childhood   Education   (ECE)   are   examined   against   a   backdrop   of   developments  in  Australia  and  other  countries  as  appropriate.    

Changing  profile  of  the  early  childhood  educator  

Globally,  there  is  no  consensus  or  clarity  on  what  is  expected  of  ECE  graduates  at  the   time  of  graduation  from  a  three  or  four  year  bachelor  degree.  The  Australian  Children’s   Education  and  Care  Quality  Authority  (ACECQA)  is  responsible  for  the  accreditation  of   course  content  in  this  country.  The  pay  and  conditions  of  employing  ECE  graduates  are   linked  to  industrial  awards  but  this  system  is  fragmented  due  to  the  involvement  of  a   mix  of  trade  unions  with  inadequate  national  coordination.  The  limited  recognition  of   masters  degrees  within  the  current  awards  is  a  particular  concern  as  there  is  no  formal   approval  of  the  value  of  undertaking  postgraduate  studies  reflected  in  the  pay  scales,   leaving  it  to  employers  to  validate  staff  achievements  through  advanced  studies.  Overall,   the  absence  of  a  national  professional  registration  system  for  ECE  graduates  has  also   meant   that   there   is   no   systematic   way   of   assessing   the   employment   expectations   of   these   graduates.   In   effect,   there   has   been   limited   movement   in   addressing   issues   of   public   visibility   and   validation,   career   pathways   linked   to   formal   studies,   as   well   as  

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Waniganayake     —     Varhaiskasvatuksen  Tiedelehti     —     JECER     3(1)  2014,  65–81.   http://jecer.org/fi      

professional  registration  and  licensure,  as  identified  particularly  in  terms  of  leadership   development  nearly  two  decades  ago  (Waniganayake,  1998).  

The  roles  and  responsibilities  of  ECE  graduates  working  in  childcare  centres  have  varied   overtime.  About  thirty  years  ago,  being  a  teacher  of  young  children  was  clearly  defined   as   an   autonomous   role   carried   out   by   an   ECE   graduate   who   was   responsible   for   designing   and   delivering   an   education   program   for   pre-­‐schoolers.   In   contrast,   the   contemporary  profiles  of  ECE  graduates  incorporate  education  and  care  responsibilities   more  explicitly  and  cover  a  wider  age  range  of  children  birth  to  five  years.  Government   policy,  through  the  National  Quality  Standard  (ACECQA,  2012)  and  its  predecessor,  the   Quality  Improvement  and  Accreditation  System  (QIAS)  in  1993,  has  reinforced  this  open   profile  since  the  1990s.  The  emphasis  on  working  in  partnership  with  families  and  the   wider   community   and   the   inclusion   of   service   management   and   leadership   responsibilities  (ACECQA,  2012)  reflects  the  expanding  roles  of  ECE  graduates,  requiring   engagement   with   a   wide   range   of   stakeholders.   The   once   clearly   defined   teacher   responsibilities  focusing  exclusively  on  the  education  of  young  children,  has  therefore   widened   in   scope   with   increasing   demands   from   parents,   government   and   other   professionals  working  in  different  ways  with  children  in  early  childhood  settings.  

As   reflected   in   Figure   1,   traditionally,   in   Australia,   those   graduating   with   an   ECE   Diploma  or  Degree,   found  employment   in  a  preschool  or  kindergarten  working  with   children  between  three  to  five  years  age.  Since  the  1980s  however,  with  the  large  scale   expansion  of  childcare  centres  employment  opportunities  for  early  childhood  graduates   emerged   in   settings   catering   for   children   from   birth   to   five   years.     Traditional   preschools   or   kindergartens   offered   half-­‐day   educational   programs,   and   are   closed   during  school  holidays.  In  contrast,  childcare  centres  are  open  for  longer  hours,  often   from  7am  to  6pm  and  remain  open  for  at  least  48  weeks  of  the  year  in  order  to  obtain   government  funding.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Waniganayake     —     Varhaiskasvatuksen  Tiedelehti     —     JECER     3(1)  2014,  65–81.   http://jecer.org/fi      

Traditional  Profile             Contemporary  Profile  

Pre-­‐1980s                 Since  the  1990s                                                                                                                                                                                  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIGURE  1     Changing  profile  of  ECE  graduates  

 

Research  conducted  during  the  1990s  on  exploring  workplace  responsibilities  of  early   childhood  educators   is   limited.   Initial   leadership  studies  conducted  by   those  such  as   Hayden   (1997),   Rodd   (1998),   and   Waniganayake,   Morda   and   Kapsalakis   (2000)   suggested  that  soon  after  graduation  with  little  or  no  work  experience  in  the  sector,  but   as  the  highest  qualified  person,  ECE  graduates  were  frequently  expected  to  jump  into   the   role   of   a   centre   director/manager.   Reflecting   on   these   studies   now   it   becomes   apparent  that  unenviable  demands  were  placed  on  new  and  inexperienced  graduates  in   managing  and   leading  as  a   childcare   centre  director.  This   situation  was  exacerbated   further   for   teaching   directors   of   small   centres   where   the   director’s   responsibilities   included   regular   classroom  work  with   children.   Importantly,   research  by  Rosier  and   Lloyd-­‐Smith  (1996,  p.  i)  revealed  that  "low  pay  and  low  status  relative  to  high  level  of   responsibility  inherent  in  the  job"  contributed  significantly  to  staff  dissatisfaction  and   high   turnover   rates   (cited   in   Waniganayake,   1998,   p.111).   This   pattern   was   also   reflected   in  other  countries  such  as  the  USA,  where  Jorde-­‐Bloom  (1994)  reported  on   concerns  on  expecting  teacher  education  graduates  to  take  on  broader &#x

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