Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Review the case study scenario, Leadership Problems at Valley Hill,? located in this modules Learning Resources.Reflect on the knowledge and skills you have gained in the Learning Re | Wridemy

Review the case study scenario, Leadership Problems at Valley Hill,? located in this modules Learning Resources.Reflect on the knowledge and skills you have gained in the Learning Re

Review the case study scenario, Leadership Problems at Valley Hill,? located in this modules Learning Resources.Reflect on the knowledge and skills you have gained in the Learning Re

To prepare:

Review the case study scenario, “Leadership Problems at Valley Hill,” located in this module’s Learning Resources.
Reflect on the knowledge and skills you have gained in the Learning Resources regarding leadership theory and evidence-based behaviors that support positive change.
Identify theories and evidence-based strategies that you feel would be most relevant to the scenario presented. As you reflect on these, also consider their congruence with your own values and beliefs.
Consider how you might use the leadership theories and/or evidence-based behaviors to approach the identified challenge.
By Day 5 of Week 1
Post a response to the situation presented in the Valley Hill case study. In your response, present an analysis that addresses the following:
The leader’s role in striving to create an open, supportive, and challenging culture in the workplace at Valley Hill or any early childhood workplace
How specific leadership theories and/or evidence-based behaviors could contribute to the effectiveness of this leader and improve the current culture and practices at Valley Hill
A personal reflection of your own leadership strengths and areas for opportunity, and how these might promote or inhibit successful resolution of the presented scenario.

8085 Week Discussion 2: Effective Leadership in Practice

Leaders play an essential role in influencing and supporting positive change. Effective leaders are flexible in responding to emerging situations, but they also have a vast capacity to envision opportunity. Coalitions that collectively work together toward common goals need leaders who foster collaboration and create enclaves dedicated to supporting positive change.

Leading is not often effortless, easy, and stress free. Leaders may find themselves in challenging situations in which they encounter new challenges, unusual twists on common scenarios, or the altogether unexpected. At times, challenging situations may be emotionally and ethically draining, and/or they may present leaders with questions about the most effective way to proceed. Leadership theory and evidence-based behaviors are useful frameworks that influence change in a strategic way that is likely to leverage desired outcomes.

In this Discussion, you will explore a scenario that describes an early childhood setting facing multiple challenges. A new director has just been hired and is filled with high expectations to support the center in becoming “an engaging, warm, and safe learning space for young children.” Based on evidence from your personal/professional experience and the literature presented in the Learning Resources, your role is to advise the new director about specific leadership strategies she can use to influence positive change within Valley Hill.

To prepare:

· Review the case study scenario, “Leadership Problems at Valley Hill,” located in this module’s Learning Resources.

· Reflect on the knowledge and skills you have gained in the Learning Resources regarding leadership theory and evidence-based behaviors that support positive change.

· Identify theories and evidence-based strategies that you feel would be most relevant to the scenario presented. As you reflect on these, also consider their congruence with your own values and beliefs.

· Consider how you might use the leadership theories and/or evidence-based behaviors to approach the identified challenge.

Assignment Task Part 1

Write  a 1 ½ page response to the situation presented in the Valley Hill case study. In your response, present an analysis that addresses the following:

· The leader’s role in striving to create an open, supportive, and challenging culture in the workplace at Valley Hill or any early childhood workplace

· How specific leadership theories and/or evidence-based behaviors could contribute to the effectiveness of this leader and improve the current culture and practices at Valley Hill

· A personal reflection of your own leadership strengths and areas for opportunity, and how these might promote or inhibit successful resolution of the presented scenario

Assignment Task Part 2

Read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

Respond to one of your colleagues’ postings in 150 word response at least one of the following ways:

· Validate or provide contrasting perspectives for an aspect (or aspects) of your colleague’s posting.

· Offer an additional perspective on the leader’s role in creating an open, supportive, and challenging culture in the workplace at Valley Hill.

Assignment Task Part 3

Again, read a selection of your colleagues’ postings.

Respond to one of your colleagues’ postings in 150 word response by building on your colleague’s thinking related to specific theories and behaviors that could contribute to the leader’s effectiveness and in what ways.

Note:  Be sure to cite appropriate references in APA format to substantiate your thinking.

Learning Resources

Required Resources

Amanchukwu, R. N., Stanley, G. J., & Ololube, N. P. (2015). A review of leadership theories, principles and styles and their relevance to educational management. Management, 5(1), 6–14. doi:10.5923/j.mm.20150501.02

Beyer, B. (2012). Blending constructs and concepts: Development of emerging theories of organizational leadership and their relationship to leadership practices for social justice. Retrieved from http://cnx.org/contents/[email protected]/Blending-Constructs-and-Concepts

Bloom, P. J. & Abel, M. B. (2015). Expanding the lens—leadership as an organizational asset. Young Children, 70(2), 10–17. 

Hallet, E. (2013). We all share a common vision and passion: Early years professionals reflect upon their leadership of practice role. Journal of Early Childhood Research, 11(3), 312–325. doi:10.1177/1476718X1349088

Hard, L., & Jónsdóttir, A. H. (2013). Leadership is not a dirty word: Exploring and embracing leadership in ECEC. European Early Childhood Education Research Journal, 21(3), 311–325. doi:10.1080/1350293X.2013.814355

Leeson, C. (2014). The pressures of leading early years services in a changing world. In J. Moyles, J. Payler, & J. Georgeson (Eds.), Early years foundations: Critical issues (2nd ed., pp. 143–154). Maidenhead, UK: Open University Press. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264688756_  

Lewis, J., & Hill, J. (2012). What does leadership look like in early childhood settings? Retrieved from http://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/our-publications/every-child-magazine/every-child-index/every-child-vol-18-4-2012/leadership-look-like-early-childhood-settings/

McCormick Center for Early Childhood Leadership. (2015, Summer). An international perspective on early childhood leadership. Research Notes. Retrieved from http://mccormickcenter.nl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/RN-Summer-2015.pdf

Muñoz, M., Boulton , P., Johnson, T., & Unal, C. (2015). Leadership development for a changing early childhood landscape. YC Young Children, 70(2), 26–31.

National Policy Board for Educational Administration. (2015). Professional standards for educational leaders. Retrieved from http://www.ccsso.org/Documents/2015/ProfessionalStandardsforEducationalLeaders2015forNPBEAFINAL.pdf

Orr, T., & Cleveland-Innes, M. (2015). Appreciative leadership: Supporting education innovation. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(4), 235–240.  

Pfaff, L. A., Boatwright, K. J., Potthoff, A. L., Finan, C., Ulrey, L. A., & Huber, D. M. (2013). Perceptions of women and men leaders following 360‐degree feedback evaluations. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 26(1), 35–56. doi: 0.1002/piq.2113

Ramey, M. D. (2015). Out from under the radar: Making leadership visible. Young Children, 70(2), 6–10. 

Sharp, C., Lord, P., Handscomb, G., Macleod, S., Southcott, C., George, N., & Jeffes, J. (2012). Highly effective leadership in children’s centres. National College for School Leadership, Nottingham.

Van Wart, M. (2013). Lessons from leadership theory and the contemporary challenges of leaders. Public Administration Review, 73(4), 553–565. doi:10.1111/puar.12069

Wanaganayake, M. (2014). Being and becoming early childhood leaders: Reflections on leadership studies in early childhood education and the future leadership research agenda. Journal of Early Childhood Education Research, 3(1) 65–81. Retrieved from http://jecer.org/

Document: Leadership Problems at Valley Hill (PDF)

Required Media

California Department of Education (Producer). (2013). Invitation to leadership in early childhood [Video file]. Retrieved from http://ececompsat.org/competencies/lead/lead.html

Note: This video is part of a series of California ECE competencies

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013b). The characteristics of effective early childhood leaders and advocates [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 11 minutes.

 

Laureate Education (Producer). (2016). Jerlean Daniel’s my advocacy journey [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.

 

TED Conferences, LLC (Producer). (2010). Drew Dudley: Everyday leadership [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/drew_dudley_everyday_leadership?language=en

The Wallace Foundation (Producer). (2012). Great school leaders in action [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/Pages/VIDEO-Great-School-Leaders-in-Action.aspx

Optional Resources

Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (Producer). (2015). Supporting principal leadership pre-K-3rd grade learning communities [Video webinar]. Retrieved from http://www.researchconnections.org/childcare/resources/30386?q=leadership

Christie, M., Carey, M., Robertson, A., & Grainger, P. (2015). Putting transformative learning theory into practice. Australian Journal of Adult Learning, 55(1), 9. Retrieved from https://www.ajal.net.au/

DeMatthews, D. E. (2014). How to improve curriculum leadership: Integrating leadership theory and management strategies. The Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas, 87(5), 192–196. doi:10.1080/00098655.2014.911141

Heikka, J., Waniganayake, M., & Hujala, E. (2013). Contextualizing distributed leadership within early childhood education current understandings, research evidence and future challenges. Educational Management Administration & Leadership, 41(1), 30–44. doi:10.1177/1741143212462700

Rodd, J. (2013). Reflecting on the pressures, pitfalls and possibilities for examining leadership in early childhood within a cross-national research collaboration. In E. Hujala, M. Waniganayake, & J. Rodd (Eds.). Researching Leadership in Early Childhood Education (pp. 31–46). Retrieved from http://ilrfec.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/art_01Rodd.pdf

Rupprecht, E. A., Waldrop, J. S., & Grawitch, M. J. (2013). Characterizing effective leader behaviors for the future. Retrieved from http://www.slu.edu/Documents/professional_studies/OHI%20-%20Effective%20Leadership.pdf

Smith, W. K., Besharov, M. L., Wessels, A. K., & Chertok, M. (2012). A paradoxical leadership model for social entrepreneurs: Challenges, leadership skills, and pedagogical tools for managing social and commercial demands. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 11(3), 463–478. doi:10.5465/amle.2011.0021

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© 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. Page 1 of 3

Leadership Problems at Valley Hill

Valley Hill is a private, for-profit childcare program with many young children, ages 2–5, in

attendance. Over a year ago, the director became disgruntled and quit his position.

Shortly afterward, the overseeing corporation declared a hiring freeze and appointed an

acting director from within the larger for-profit organization. Though this individual met the

specified “education” requirements, she did not have a strong background in early

childhood development and had no prior experience running a program of this kind. Due

to other existing responsibilities, she encountered many difficulties in giving adequate

focus to the center’s day-to-day operations or to her own professional development.

Consequently, the mid-level administrators in the program resigned.

Lack of administrative leadership also resulted in day-to-day management issues falling to

the responsibility of individual teachers. This took focus from their vital roles in observing

and interacting with children, reflecting on healthy development and learning growth, and

communicating with family members. In addition, as teachers became accustomed to

doing things their own way, the program quality and children’s routines became

inconsistent. Though it was painstakingly clear that the center was suffering without a

leader, a handful of teachers felt they were doing a fairly good job considering their

circumstances. In fact, there was talk among them that they would be better off without a

new director. They were convinced that if they were able to hire additional teachers and

handle purchase orders themselves, the center would be back on track. It became evident

that many teachers, no matter their feelings about a new director, had become very

protective of their new sense of power.

Tensions grew. Though the staff members were trying their best, it was clear that less and

less time was being devoted to the provision of quality care, the creation of engaging

learning experiences, the encouragement of family involvement, and professional

development. In light of this, a group of concerned teachers began to voice the need for

hiring a new director with a strong background in early childhood development. Another

group then emerged, calling for serious consideration to break away from the for-profit

© 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. Page 2 of 3

organization; they identified ways to buy out the center and continue on as an

independent program. This approach left many staff members feeling nervous, unsettled,

and unable to concentrate on their work with the children. After that, conflict among staff

members was unavoidable. Opinions about the type of leadership needed, as well as

philosophical differences about quality experiences in early childhood settings, swarmed

the center.

Before long, families with children in the center started to express their concerns about

changes, not only in the way the program was being run, but also in the “feeling” of the

program. Some voiced their disappointment and discomfort in the way staff were

interacting with one another. Others cited their children’s demeanor, explaining that many

did not want to come to school because it did not feel “fun” or ‘safe” anymore. Without a

director in place to hear their concerns, families began to mobilize, creating an advocacy

group which lobbied the larger corporation to stop the hiring freeze at once and hire a

qualified director. These families made it clear that they would have no other choice than

to leave the program if the organization failed to meet their requests.

After several meetings that included the families, select staff members, and

representatives from the for-profit corporation, the hiring freeze came to a close. The

process of actively seeking a qualified administrator began with the formation of a hiring

committee composed of two members from each stakeholder group. The committee took

on the charge of writing the job description and summarizing the skills, knowledge, and

dispositions required of the new director.

Now that you have read the scenario, imagine that you are an early childhood leader who

came upon the advertisement for this administrative position. You interviewed for the

position and got the job!

As you prepare to begin your job, you know about the troubles recently experienced at the

center. You are also aware that much is expected of you to turn this center back into an

engaging, warm, and safe learning space for young children. Reflect on how to approach

the current state of Valley Hill. Consider which leadership styles you need to apply to

accomplish the feat of transforming the center.

© 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. Page 3 of 3

With these thoughts in mind, return back to this module’s Discussion and, following the

posting prompt in the online classroom, discuss which leadership styles you would apply

(and why) if you were the new administrator at Valley Hill.

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