Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Below are statements coming from different psychological scales constructed by different authors; what the scales are measuring nor the number of scales that are represented by thes | Wridemy

Below are statements coming from different psychological scales constructed by different authors; what the scales are measuring nor the number of scales that are represented by thes

Below are statements coming from different psychological scales constructed by different authors; what the scales are measuring nor the number of scales that are represented by thes

Week 2 – Assignment: Create a Table to Group Items Representing a Common Concept

Instructions

Below are statements coming from different psychological scales constructed by different authors; what the scales are measuring nor the number of scales that are represented by these items are identified. 

Since the psychological variables measured by the items are fairly easily identifiable, create a table in which you will group those items that represent a common concept. 

Then, invent a construct or variable name for these items. This is an exercise that tests your intuitive abilities to spot the supposedly hidden constructs represented by these items. Consider this assignment as an “armchair” factor analysis.

Items:

  1. I feel irritable, easily agitated, and am impatient a few days before my period.
  2. I feel anxious watching a teacher work on an algebraic equation on the whiteboard.
  3. This is the dreariest time of my life.
  4. I am just as happy as when I was younger.
  5. My life could be happier than it is now.
  6. I have cramps that begin on the first day of my period.
  7. I don’t feel good being required to enroll in statistics.
  8. I expect some interesting and pleasant things to happen to me in the future.
  9. My breasts feel tender and sore a few days before my period.
  10. I feel old and somewhat tired.
  11. As I look back on my life, I am fairly well satisfied.
  12. I hate buying a math textbook.
  13. I feel depressed for several days before my period.
  14. I have backaches which begin the same day as my period.
  15. I don’t like reading and interpreting graphs or charts.
  16. I take prescription drug for the pain during my period.
  17. I’ve gotten pretty much what I expected out of life.
  18. Compared to other people, I get more the share of bad luck.
  19. I don’t like being told how to interpret probability statements.
  20. For several days before my period I feel exhausted, lethargic or tired.
  21. Most of the things I do are boring or monotonous.
  22. I’m feel my chest pound when I walk into a math class.
  23. I have abdominal pain or discomfort which begins one day before my period.
  24. I would not change my life even if I could.
  25. I’m anxious when I am waiting to get a math test returned even when I expect to have done well.
  26. The pain I have with my period is not intense but a continuous dull aching.
  27. I feel weak and dizzy during my period.
  28. I feel restless listening to somebody explaining a math formula.
  29. As I grow older, things seem better than I thought they would be.

I have gotten more of the breaks in life than most of the people I know.

Psychological Assessment Tools For Mental Health

This page is maintained as a service to mental health professionals. The scales and measures listed here are designed to assist clinicians to practice effectively. Resources linked-to from this page should only be used by appropriately qualified, experienced, and supervised professionals. Psychology Tools does not host any of these scales and cannot take responsibility for the accuracy or availability of linked resources. To the best of our knowledge the assessment measures listed here are either free of copyright restrictions, or are being shared by the relevant rights-holders.

Jump to

· Introduction

· Cognitive Therapy Competence / Adherence Measures

· Addiction

· Anger

· Anxiety

· Assertiveness

· Autism Spectrum And Social Communication Disorders

· Body Dysmorphic Disorder

· Bipolar

· Depression

· Dissociation

· Eating disorders

· Grief / Prolonged Grief

· Hoarding disorder

· Intolerance Of Uncertainty

· Mindfulness

· Motivation

· Misophonia

· Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

· Pain

· Personality Disorder

· Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) / Complex PTSD

· Procrastination

· Psychosis

· Sleep

· Suicidality

· Tinnitus

· Trichotillomania

· Information

Only qualified mental health professionals should use these materials.

Introduction

Mental health professionals use a variety of instruments to assess mental health and wellbeing. Common purposes for psychological testing include: screening for the presence or absence of common mental health conditions; making a formal diagnosis of a mental health condition; assessment of changes in symptom severity; and monitoring client outcomes across the course of therapy.

Screening: Brief psychological measures can be used to ‘screen’ individuals for a range of mental health conditions. Screening measures are often questionnaires completed by clients. Screening tends are quick to administer but results are only indicative: if a positive result is found on a screening test then the screening test can be followed up by a more definitive test.

Diagnosis: Psychological assessment measures can support a qualified clinician in making a formal diagnosis of a mental health problem. Mental health assessment with the purpose of supporting a diagnosis can include the use of semi-structured diagnostic interviews and validated questionnaires. Items in self-report measures used for diagnosis often bear a close correspondence to criteria specified in the diagnostic manuals (ICD and DSM).

Symptom & outcome monitoring: One strand of evidence-based practice requires that therapists use outcome measures to monitor progress and guide the course of therapy. Psychologists, CBT therapists, and other mental health professionals often ask their clients to complete self-report measures regularly to assess changes in symptom severity.

Cognitive Therapy Competence / Adherence Measures

· Assessment of Core CBT Skills (ACCS) | Kate Muse, Freda McManus, Sarah Rakovshik, Helen Kennerley | 2014

· Website   accs-scale.co.uk

· Manual   download    archived copy

· Feedback form   download    archived copy

· Cognitive Therapy Rating Scale (CTRS) | Jeff Young & Aaron Beck | 1980

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Manual   HYPERLINK "https://members.academyofct.org/files/documentlibrary/CTRS_Manual.pdf" download   archived copy

· Cognitive Therapy Scale – Revised (CTS-R) | Blackburn, James, Milne, Reichelt | 2001

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Manual   download    archived copy

· Collaborative Case Conceptualization Rating Scale (CCC-RS) | Kuyken, Padesky, Dudley | 2009

· Rating scale & coding manual   download    archived copy

· Score sheet & feedback form   download    archived copy

· Kuyken, W., Beshai, S., Dudley, R., Abel, A., Görg, N., Gower, P., … & Padesky, C. A. (2016). Assessing competence in collaborative case conceptualization: Development and preliminary psychometric properties of the Collaborative Case Conceptualization Rating Scale (CCC-RS).  Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy44(2), 179-192.   download    archived copy

Addiction

· Drinking motives questionnaire | Cooper, Russell, Skinner, Windle | 1992

· Scale   download   archived copy

· Cooper, M. L., Russell, M., Skinner, J. B., & Windle, M. (1992). Development and validation of a three-dimensional measure of drinking motives.  Psychological Assessment,4,123-132.

· Drinking motives questionnaire – adolescent | Cooper | 1994

· Scale   download   archived copy

· Cooper, M.L. (1994). Motivations for alcohol use among adolescents:  Development and validation of a four-factor model.   Psychological Assessment, 6,117-128.

· Leeds Dependence Questionnaire | Raistrick, Bradshaw, Tober, Weiner, Allison, Healey | 1994

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Raistrick, D.S., Bradshaw, J., Tober, G., Weiner, J., Allison, J. & Healey, C. (1994) Development of the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire, Addiction, 89, pp 563-572.

· Maudsley Addiction Profile (MAP) | Marsden, Gossop, Stewart, Best, Farrell, Lehmann, Edwards, Strang | 1998

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Marsden, J. Gossop, M. Stewart, D. Best, D. Farrell, M. Lehmann, P. Edwards, C. & Strang, J. (1998) The Maudsley Addiction Profile (MAP): A brief instrument for assessing treatment outcome,  Addiction 93(12): 1857-1867.

· Readiness to Change Questionnaire (RTQ) | Heather, Rollnick | 1993

· User’s manual   download    archived copy

· Rollnick, Heather, Gold, Hall (1992)

· Severity of Dependence Scale | Gossop, Darke, Griffiths, Hando, Powis, Hall, Strang | 1995

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Gossop, M., Darke, S., Griffiths, P., Hando, J., Powis, B., Hall, W., Strang, J. (1995). The Severity of Dependence Scale (SDS): psychometric properties of the SDS in English and Australian samples of heroin, cocaine and amphetamine users. Addiction 90(5): 607-614.

· Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) | Miller, Tonigan | 1996

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S. (1996). Assessing drinkers’ motivation for change: the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES).  Psychology of Addictive Behaviors10(2), 81.

Anger

· Aggression Questionnaire | Buss, Perry | 1992

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Buss, A.H., & Perry, M. (1992). The Aggression Questionnaire.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63, 452-459.

· Clinical Anger Scale | Snell, Gum, Shuck, Mosley, Hite | 1995

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Snell, W. E., Jr., Gum, S., Shuck, R. L., Mosley, J. A., & Hite, T. L.. (1995).  The Clinical Anger Scale: Preliminary reliability and validity.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 51, 215-226

Anxiety

· Brief Fear Of Negative Evaluation Scale | Leary | 1983

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Fear Questionnaire (FQ) (Phobia) | Marks, Matthews | 1979

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Marks, I. M., & Mathews, A. M. (1979). Brief standard self-rating for phobic patients.  Behaviour Research and Therapy17(3), 263-267.

· Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) | Spitzer, Kroenke, Williams, Lowe | 2006

· Scale   download

· Spitzer RL, Kroenke K, Williams JBW, Lowe B. A brief measure for assessing generalized anxiety disorder. Arch Inern Med. 2006;166:1092-1097.

· Hamilton Rating Scale For Anxiety (HAM-A) | Hamilton | 1959

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Hamilton, M. (1959).The assessment of anxiety states by rating.  British Journal of Medical Psychology 32, 50-55.

· Health Anxiety Inventory (HAI) | Salkovskis, Rimes, Warwick, Clark | 2002

· Scale   download

· Salkovskis, P. M., Rimes, K. A., Warwick, H. M. C., & Clark, D. M. (2002). The Health Anxiety Inventory: development and validation of scales for the measurement of health anxiety and hypochondriasis. Psychological Medicine, 32(05), 843-853.

· Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR) | Liebowitz | 1987

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Mobility Inventory For Agoraphobia (MIA) | Chambless, Caputo, Jasin, Gracely, Williams | 1985

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Chambless, D. L., Caputo, G. C., Jasin, S. E., Gracely, E. J., & Williams, C. (1985). The mobility inventory for agoraphobia.  Behaviour research and therapy23(1), 35-44.

· Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) | Shear, Brown, Barlow, Money, Sholomskas, Woods, Gorman, Papp | 1997

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Shear, M. K., Brown, T. A., Barlow, D. H., Money, R., Sholomskas, D. E., Woods, S. W., … & Papp, L. A. (1997). Multicenter collaborative panic disorder severity scale.  American Journal of Psychiatry154(11), 1571-1575.

· Penn State Worry Questionnaire | Meyer, Miller, Metzger, Borkovec | 1990

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Meyer, T. J., Miller, M. L., Metzger, R. L., & Borkovec, T. D. (1990). Development and validation of the penn state worry questionnaire.  Behaviour Research and Therapy28(6), 487-495.

· Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale | Spence | 1998

· Scale   download    archived copy

· Scale website  link   archived copy

· Spence, S. H. (1998). A measure of anxiety symptoms among children.  Behaviour Research and Therapy, 36 (5), 545-566.

· Severity Measure For Agoraphobia | Craske, Wittchen, Bogels, Stein, Andrews, Lebu | 2013

· Scale – Adult   download    archived copy

· Severity Measure For Generalized Anxiety Disorder | Craske, Wittchen, Bogels, Stein, Andrews, Lebeu | 2013

· Scale – Adult   download    archived copy

· Scale – Child Age 11-17   download    archived copy

· Severity Measure For Panic Disorder | Craske, Wittchen, Bogels, Stein, Andrews, Lebeu | 2013

· Scale – Adult   download    archived copy

· Severity Measure For Social Anxiety Disorder | Craske, Wittchen, Bogels, Stein, Andrews, Lebeu | 2013

· Scale – Adult   download    archived copy

· Scale – Child Age 11-17   download    <a rel='nofollow' target='_blank' href='https://web.archive.org/web/20190426215048/https:/www.psychiatry.org/File%20Library/Psychiatrists/Practice/DSM/APA_DSM5_Severity-Measure-For-Social-Anxiety-Disorder-Child-Age-11-to-17.p

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